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Ubud Gourmet

Ubud's Best Restaurants, Cafes, Bars and Recipes

What do you do when hunger sets in, but you’re short on time and even shorter on cash? While Ubud is blissfully free of cheap international fast food chains, we do have a broad selection of quick and easy street food on offer at all times of day and night. From the roaming kaki lima carts to the more stationary food stalls and stands, it is easy to find great eats here that are fast, cheap, and authentically local.

Bakso from Pengosekan

Bakso from Pengosekan

Bakso

Bakso is one of the most ubiquitous and popular forms of street food in Indonesia. In fact, it has even been reported that this was one of President Obama’s favourite dishes as a child growing up in Jakarta. Although there are countless variations of bakso, it almost always consists of a clear broth, noodles, meatballs made from chicken, beef or fish, and garnishes like bok choy and fried shallots. Season it to taste with lashings of chili sauce and kecap manis.

Where to find it:

Come lunch time and late afternoon, there are kaki lima bakso vendors plying nearly every street in Ubud. Simply flag down the vendor, grab a bowl and find a seat on the nearest wall or doorstep to slurp down your soup. For all-day bakso, head to the stand across from the petrol station in Pengosekan in the Delta parking lot. Ask for the bakso mie ayam and you will get a heaping bowl of bakso laden with egg noodles, shredded chicken, bok choy, and one massive bakso ball.

Gorengan Jalan Raya Ubud

Gorengan Jalan Raya Ubud

Gorengan / Batagor

Although not the healthiest of street foods, gorengan makes for a delicious in-between-meals snack. The name basically means ‘fried’, which is exactly how they prepare these battered crispy golden bites. There are many different types of gorengan including tahu goreng (fried tofu), ubi goreng (fried sweet potato), utik-utik (dough balls filled with shredded herbs and bean sprouts), and pisang goreng (fried banana). Gorengan also goes by the name Batagor if it is made in the Bandung style, which includes crunchy deep fried tempe and crispy wontons.

Where to find it:

If you want to try a bit of everything, head to the gorengan stall on Jalan Raya Ubud at the bottom of Jalan Tirta Tawar. The husband and wife team here starts frying up batches of bite-sized gorengan from about 4pm onwards, and you can get a whole bag of fried tofu, sweet potato, banana, and more for about Rp 10,000. For great batagor, head to the stall outside Delta Dewata supermarket in the early evening.

Nasi Jinggo

Nasi Jinggo consists of little banana leaf packets filled with a white or saffron rice and a mix of tasty shredded meat, noodles, abon (pork or beef floss), peanuts and sambal, although the contents will vary depending on the vendor. Portions are quite small, so you can grab one or two for a quick snack or stock up with many to make a full meal.

Where to find it:

Throughout the day and night you can find takeaway nasi jinggo at numerous small warungs and from vendors selling it on the side of the road. One of the most famous places to get nasi jinggo after dark is in front Nur Salon on Jalan Hanoman, but be warned that the sambal here is not for the light-hearted.

Martabak Pengosekan

Martabak Pengosekan

Martabak

Basically a savoury pancake or crepe fried on an iron griddle, martabak has its origins in Yemen, but can now be found in India, Malaysia, Singapore, and all across Indonesia. In Ubud you can find a few different variations of martabak including martabak stuffed with minced spiced meat, and a vegetarian version with egg. Both versions also usually have sliced green onions and herbs in the mix, and they are often served with pickled vegetables on the side.

Where to find it:

Martabak vendors generally set up shop in the evening, and you can find a few on Jalan Raya Ubud at the end closest to the Arjuna statue. However, many locals and expats alike swear by the stall in front of the MG Pet Shop and the martabak stalls at the Pasar Malam (the night market) in Payangan.

Terang Bulan

For those with a sweet tooth, terang bulan is hard to resist. The name means ‘moonlight’, which may be an allusion to the round shape of this golden cake. Sandwiched between the cake you will find either chocolate, cheese or sweetened condensed milk, and some versions also include peanuts or bananas. Terang bulan also goes by the name of martabak manis or martabak bangka.

Where to get it:

Terang bulan is usually only available in the evenings. Popular spots to get it include the stall across from the Pengosekan petrol station (in front of the Delta), on Jalan Raya Andong just up from the Delta Dewata supermarket, and for a special green cake version, the martabak stall in front of the MG Pet Shop.

Satay Ayam Lilit

Satay

So simple, yet so tasty, these grilled meat skewers come in all different flavours including ayam (chicken), babi (pork), sapi (beef), ikan (fish), and kambing (goat). Besides the regular chunks of marinated grilled meat on a stick, in Bali you can also find satay lilit, which is made with minced spiced meat wrapped around lemongrass or bamboo skewers. And of course, satay just wouldn’t be satay without the accompaniment of a rich and slightly spicy peanut sauce.

Where to get it:

Some popular street food satay spots in Ubud include the satay babi vendor outside of Pura Dalem at the top of Jalan Sukma and the satay ikan vendor next to the Minimart in Campuhan, both of whom sell their goods in the evening. And although not technically a street food stall, the Sate Kambing Madura warung on Jalan Raya Ubud does satay kambing that is simply to die for.

 

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Ubud's Best Street Food